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We got a call this afternoon from a nice gentleman named Ben. While walking on the beach near the Jetty he found some fish eggs, which had just recently washed ashore. Curious to what they were and if they could be saved, he called us. They turned out to be lingcod eggs. We have placed them into a tank with fresh ocean water going into it and now we will have to wait and see if they are still viable. Thanks for the call Ben!
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It's snowing on the beach!
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Current weather conditions at the Aquarium!
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What a beautiful surprise to wake up to this morning.The snow made it all the way to the beach today! Be sure to bundle up if you go outside today and be safe on the roads. And enjoy the snow while it lasts!
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What a great turnout we had today for the monthly 'Treasure the Beach' cleanup event in Seaside! Lots of people volunteered their time to help pick up trash in the dunes and along the shore. We have a very clean beach again and we would like to thank everyone for the past and future support!
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Treasure the Beach is tomorrow morning from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Pick up your SOLVE bags and gloves in front of the Seashore Inn. Thank you for helping us keep Seaside Beach clean and safe for everyone.
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Unfortunately, despite everyone's best efforts the sea turtle did not make it. We would like to take the time to thank everyone for their well wishes and a special thanks to both the Seattle Aquarium and the Oregon Coast Aquarium for all of their hard work and efforts in rehabbing sea turtles found on Oregon and Washington beaches. Another thank you to Don Best for his quick reporting of the stranded turtle.
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At 9:00 am this morning we received a call of a sea turtle found at Rockaway Beach. The turtle is a male olive ridley sea turtle that was barely moving due to the cold. Staff at the Seaside Aquarium were able to get it off the beach to begin warming it up. The turtle is now on it's way to the Seattle Aquarium to begin the process of rehabilitation. Hopefully all will go well and the turtle will be released back into warmer waters.
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We are on the look out for a fur seal entangled in rope. This morning we responded to this fur seal with rope around it's neck on the south end of Seaside beach. We were hoping to capture the little guy and remove the rope and let him free. Unfortunately, he was quite spry and swam away as soon as we approached. If you seem him please give us a call at 503-738-6211, we would really like to help the little guy out.
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According to NOAA "Guadalupe fur seals are members of the “eared seal” family, Otariidae. Their breeding grounds are almost entirely on Guadalupe Island, off the Pacific coast of Mexico, with recent re-colonization off the San Benito Archipelago. A small number of Guadalupe fur seals have also been reported on the northern Channel Islands off California. Commercial sealers heavily hunted Guadalupe fur seals in the 1700s to the 1800s until they were thought to be extinct in the early 1900s. Dr. Hubbs and Dr. Bartholomew from the University of California rediscovered them breeding in a cave on Guadalupe Island in 1954. The Guadalupe fur seal population has continued to increase from the small remnant group on Guadalupe Island due to protection by the Mexican Government. Guadalupe fur seals are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act and depleted under the Marine Mammal Protection Act." To learn more about Guadalupe fur seals visit: www.fisheries.noaa.gov/species/guadalupe-fur-seal
Seaside Aquarium
We responded to a Guadalupe fur seal today who decided hau-lout for some rest. This animal was first seen on Monday, January 7th entangled in rope near Ocean Shores, Washington. Luckily, Washington police officers were able to cut the fur seal free and the fur seal happily took off back to the ocean. The three-foot juvenile fur seal, is headed south and looks to be fat and healthy (minus some superficial wounds from the rope that appear to be healing). Good luck little buddy!
Seaside Aquarium
This afternoon we got a call about a large skate which washed ashore at the Cove. Upon closer examination we were able to determine that the four-foot skate was a female longnose skate (Raja rhina), which had been very close to laying an egg casing (often referred to as a mermaid’s purse). The egg casing was about 5 inches long and was still in the process of developing. Longnose skates can reach a maximum size of 4 ½ feet and can live for 20+ years. They are bottom feeders, which have adapted a unique way of capturing prey by pouncing on top of their victims and pinning them to the ocean floor. We also noticed quite a few larger moon jellies littering the shore line, half of a small, male California sea lion skull and a hatched-out egg casing from another type of much smaller skate, a black skate. Happy beachcombing! If you ever find something on the beach you can not identify and would like to know what it is, send us a clear photograph and we will do our best to identify the creature for you.
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Look who we found on the beach...a jellyfish-dwelling anemone! After the larva of this anemone is ingested by a jellyfish, the tables are turned as it begins to feed on the host's internal organs. Eventually it transforms into an almost transparent anemone that hangs inside the jelly. Ultimately the anemone drops off and assumes a bottom-dwelling existence in a mud/sand habitat. The fate of the host jelly is not always predictable.
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Have you ever seen a hermit crab without a shell on? This little guy washed in after some rough weather and somehow lost his shell. You can see that their body doesn't look much like a true crab at all. Their abdomen forms a tail that curls up much likes a shrimp's tail. Their abdomen is also very soft so they borrow empty snail shells to live in. As they grow they need to exchange this shell for a bigger one. Luckily we were able to give this guy a new shell and he seems much happier!
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This beautiful, saw-whet owl came to us with what appeared to be a broken wing. It will be taken to the Wildlife Center of the North Coast for further evaluation, treatment, and love! Good luck little buddy. The northern saw-whet owl (Aegolius acadicus) is the most common owl found in forests across North America. Those that live in forests near the coastline have been seen feeding on marine invertebrates such as amphipods and isopods.
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This year's first Treasure the Beach event was a success. Thank you to everyone who showed up and helped clean the beach. With your help we were able to remove 80 pounds of trash from the beach! Join us Saturday, February 2nd for the next beach clean up.
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Treasure the Beach is tomorrow morning from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Pick up your SOLVE bags and gloves in front of the Seashore Inn. Thank you for helping keep Seaside's beach clean and safe for everyone!
Seaside Aquarium
New year, new crabbing season. Stay safe out there friends!
Seaside Aquarium
The winter whale migration is underway! Tomorrow's forecast calls for little wind and no rain, a perfect (and most likely only) day to look for these migrating whales this week. Some of the best places to catch a glimpses of these traveling giants are at Ecola State Park, Silver Point, Cape Falcon, and Neahkahnie Mountain.
Seaside Aquarium
Some of the biggest tides of the year this weekend are combined with extremely large surf. Be safe on the beaches and keep an eye out for marine life along the tide line. We found these very small skin breathing sea cucumbers (Leptosynapta Clark) which were unearthed by the tide and surf. They're not like most other sea cucumbers, as they have no tube feet or respiratory tree. Instead, oxygen is exchanged through their body wall, hence the name skin breathing sea cucumbers. This particular species is found all over the Pacific Northwest, from British Columbia down to California and even Mexico. They are born in the springtime and immediately burrow into the sediment. By around August they reach their full size of about 1.3 inches in length. They are part of the echinoderm family, which makes them related to sea stars, sea urchins, sand dollars, and brittle stars, however, being relatives doesn't necessarily make them a happy family. Their biggest predators are sun stars.
Seaside Aquarium
Next time you pass by bull kelp, you might want to take a closer look...Storms, high winds and violent currents may cause kelp to be ripped up from the sea floor. Strong wave action tangles the kelp, which eventually washes up on the beach in enormous knots.
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It's a little windy on the coast today! https://youtu.be/IogaAd6JeCY
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The storm has passed! The surf is still big, be careful on the beach.
Seaside Aquarium
There is a high surf, high wind warning for the northern Oregon coast today. Be safe and watch out for sneaker waves! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mmiv-TUf57E
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2019 tide tables are finally here! Now if we could only go clamming...
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Seaside Aquarium, 200 North Prom, Seaside, Oregon 97138 Tel: (503) 738-6211.