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SEASIDE AQUARIUM

FEED THE SEALS


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A big thank you to everyone on Seaside beach yesterday who gave this beautiful sea lion the space it needed to rest up. After a few hours of what looked like some well deserved rest, this little guy continued on its adventure and headed back out to sea! Thanks for stopping in Seaside!
Seaside Aquarium
It's a little rough out there! This little guy has come ashore to rest. Please remember to give these animals space on the beach, it is where they come to take a break when storms hit.
Seaside Aquarium
Can't think of a better way to celebrate Valentine's Day and Oregon's 158th birthday! #fishbouquet #cleanbeach
Seaside Aquarium
Here is a quick video of the sea turtle shortly after arriving at the Seaside Aquarium. After being rescued by staff from the Seaside Aquarium, the turtle was placed on a foam pad and given blankets to start the process of slowly bringing the turtle's body temperature back up. The 50 pound turtle spent the night in Seaside and was transferred to the Oregon Coast Aquarium first thing in the morning. The excellent staff at the Oregon Coast Aquarium has rehabilitated numerous other sea turtles over the past few years and will give the turtle its best chance for survival, however, because of the turtle's compromised state a number of thing have to go just right in order for this cold- stunned turtle to survive. Good luck! https://youtu.be/Ujmx0qS85y0
Seaside Aquarium
An exciting rescue yesterday evening! A live sea turtle came ashore at Crescent Beach in Cannon Beach. Due to the tide we could not walk the turtle around Chapman Point, but instead had to float it through this small cave. The turtle was trasfered this morning to the great staff at the Oregon Coast Aquarium. Good luck little buddy!
Seaside Aquarium
King Tides Wrap-Up Party: North Coast - King Tides Wrap-Up Party: North Coast
Seaside Aquarium
Six more weeks of winter...
Seaside Aquarium
This should be a fabulous talk!
Seaside Aquarium
The bald eagles were out in force this morning. We counted at least 12 between the South Jetty and Gearhart.
Seaside Aquarium
Our Columbia sand anemone is spawning!
Seaside Aquarium
Another chance to join this great group of volunteers!
Seaside Aquarium
An interesting phenomena occurred during our last blast of cold weather...Did you notice the 'dead' mole crabs along the tide line? Most of these seemingly dead mole crabs were simply cold-stunned. The outside air temperature had been much, much cooler than the local ocean temperature (with local air temperatures around 28-34 F and ocean temperatures around 48-50 F). These poor little crabs, when uprooted by heavy surf and stranded on the beach, got too cold to burrow down into the sand. Frozen in time, the mole crabs had to wait until the next wave, hoping it would warm them up enough so that they could try to bury themselves in the sand again.
Seaside Aquarium
Nice and sunny this morning in Seaside!
Seaside Aquarium
The ocean is full of functional beauty! Check out this sea cucumber's feeding structure... Most sea cucumber's diets consist of plankton and other organic matter filtered from either the surrounding seawater or sand. The aggregating sea cucumber, pictured below, is filtering plankton out of the water using its branch-like tentacles. Once the tentacles are laden with plankton, the sea cucumber will retract them and lick them clean.
Seaside Aquarium
People have been asking about strange fibers washing ashore. The strange hair-like fibers are actually casings, produced by the Cellophane Worm (Spichaetopterus costarum). They often wash ashore in masses during the spring and summer months, but recently we have been seeing them in the winter as well. Living just below the low tide line of sandy beaches, Cellophane Worms build and inhabit these seemingly plastic "tubes”, which become encrusted with sand. Currents and upwellings bring these tubes to the surface, eventually distributing them onto shore.
Seaside Aquarium
Someone is enjoying this wind! These amazing birds are one of the world’s most widespread shorebird. Most sanderlings spend their winter in Southern California and South America, but as many as 1,000 winter here, on Clatsop beaches. They can be seen along local beaches from August to February, but abandon Oregon in May through early July to breed in the Arctic.
Seaside Aquarium
Who knew baby nutria could be so cute! Introduced to Oregon in the 1930's, they were originally farmed and raised for their fur. When the industry collapsed in the late 1940's thousands of nutria were set loose. These guys were brought to the Aquarium and then trasported to the Wildlife Center of the North Coast!
Seaside Aquarium
Up close with a red-eyed medusa... Named for the band of red "eyes"bordering its bell, the Red-eyed Medusa can be found in shallow bays where eelgrass is plentiful. The red spots at the base of each tentacle are actually not eyes, but function as a kind of light shade or "eyelid”. Beneath the "eyelid"is an eyespot (or receptor) that detects whether or not light is being received. Using this system, the jelly can both orient itself vertically in the water and select the best light conditions for feeding. These jellies are often found in local waters.
Seaside Aquarium
Crab Boats Light Up the Horizon as the Commercial Crabbing Season Gets Under Way.... Dungeness crab have been landed commercially on the west coast of the United States since 1848 when San Francisco fisherman began the fishery. The current foundation for regulation in the fishery, size, sex, and season was established 100 years ago! Crabbers of the early 1900’s were limited to 6 inch and larger male crabs with a closed season in the fall. Flash forward to present day and West Coast Dungeness crab landings are stronger than anytime in history with regulations nearly identical to those in place in 1905. Since the fishery was established, Oregon has consistently been one of the largest producers of Dungeness crab on the West Coast.
Seaside Aquarium
We have been getting calls from locals who are noticing sea lions engaging in an interesting behavior and are wondering what is going on. Sea lions have been seen congregating together, in mass on the surface of the ocean, just outside of the surf zone. When sea lions do not want to haul out of the water, they use this tactic to sleep and rest. The protection of the group provides safety. We are probably seeing more of this due to the cold air temperatures. The ocean temperature is much warmer than the outside temperature at the moment, so the sea lions are probably just trying to stay warm like the rest of us!
Seaside Aquarium
Snow and crab what a great way to start the day! Be safe out there!
Seaside Aquarium
Looking for something warm, educational, and free to do tomorrow night? Should be a great talk!
Seaside Aquarium
A little dusting of snow on top of the Head this morning. Time to get some hot chocolate and snuggle up with the seals!
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Seaside Aquarium, 200 North Prom, Seaside, Oregon 97138 Tel: (503) 738-6211.