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SEASIDE AQUARIUM

FEED THE SEALS


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Seaside Aquarium
This guy takes camouflaging to the next level...
Seaside Aquarium
A hard hat washed ashore today with a little surprise... NUDIBRANCHS!!
Seaside Aquarium
Keep an eye out for Whimbrels! This one was spotted in Seaside this morning.
Seaside Aquarium
How precious is she? Our baby red octopus is growing up fast, she is already the size of a dime!
Seaside Aquarium
Razor clamming is closed until further notice due to high levels of domoic acid. The toxin is produced by marine diatoms which are members of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. This is what they look like under a microscope.
Seaside Aquarium
For those who missed the sunrise this morning...
Seaside Aquarium
What to become a volunteer with the Haystack Rock Awareness Program? Here is your chance...
Seaside Aquarium
Harbor Seal Pupping Season Has Official Started! This afternoon we responded to our first harbor seal pup of the year! Please remember to give these guys some space so that they can rest while their mothers are away hunting.
Seaside Aquarium
Westerly winds are bringing in more Velella!
Seaside Aquarium
Necanicum Bird Discovery Day is almost here!
Seaside Aquarium
This beautiful nudibranch is called Dirona picta, we found this poor guy in the sand along the high tide line in front of the Aquarium. He was a long way from home. Their typically range is from Charleston, Oregon south down to Baja California, Mexico.
Seaside Aquarium
Looks like they're here again! While walking along the beach, you may have noticed slimy, iridescent blue discs. These discs are a type of animal called Velella velella, commonly known as Purple Sails or By-The-Wind Sailors. Purple Sails have a clear "sail"that catches the wind and pushes them across the ocean’s surface. When the wind blows from the West, these little guys get stranded on the beach. Once washed ashore, they either become food for a variety of beach-dwelling creature or dray into the translucent "sails"you see on the beach. Purple Sails do not sting their prey; they capture their food with small sticky tentacles. Velellas feed on fish eggs and small planktonic copepods. Found in most oceans, Purple Sails are frequent visitors to the Oregon Coast. They can reach a size of 4 inches in length and 3 inches in width.
Seaside Aquarium
A big thank you to those who kept their dogs on leashes and gave this animal space so it could rest. After three days this little guy finally felt well enough to adventure off. Good luck buddy!!
Seaside Aquarium
Salmon fed anemones are happy anemones!
Seaside Aquarium
Yesterday was Tsu's 2nd year anniversary!! We are so blessed to have this remarkable fish who swam over 4,000 miles just to get here.
Seaside Aquarium
Our skate was putting on quite the show today! Obviously he is enjoying Spring Break.
Seaside Aquarium
Did you know that an octopus can squeeze through any hole or opening that is larger than its beak?
Seaside Aquarium
Good morning Seaside!
Seaside Aquarium
Have you seen our little lady Lump? Check her out!
Seaside Aquarium
Looks like it is going to be another gorgeous weekend on the Oregon Coast. Do you have your trip to Seaside planned yet?
Seaside Aquarium
Check out this awesome shot of the Seaside Aquarium, taken by Emily Carpenter!
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Seaside Aquarium, 200 North Prom, Seaside, Oregon 97138 Tel: (503) 738-6211.