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SEASIDE AQUARIUM

FEED THE SEALS


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There's nothing we love more than a mystery! We found this rope on the beach and it was covered in fish eggs. With any luck the eggs will still be viable and we will find out what type of fish laid these eggs once they hatch!
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All grown up! Our little skate hatched a couple weeks ago and is now ready for visitors!
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Another great day in paradise! Our fish will eat well tonight!
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Whimbrels have been seen in Seaside! They have stopped off here to have a snack before continuing their journey up north to breed. These guys were seen this morning gorging themselves on small sand crabs. According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, some migrating Whimbrels make a nonstop flight of 4,000 km (2,500 miles) from southern Canada or New England to South America.
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Harbor seal pupping season is officially here! We got our first two reports of seal pups on the beach this weekend. Remember if you see a seal pup on the beach it is probably just resting while its mother hunts for food. If you see a baby seal alone on the beach, leave it alone and call the Seaside Aquarium at 503-738-6211 so we can post signs around the seal encouraging people to keep their distance so that the pup can rest.
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Happy Earth Day!!!
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People are always asking what hermit crabs look like without a shell...well here is the answer! While switching shells this little guy gave us quite the show. :)
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An 'Ocean Burp' near the south end of Seaside Beach makes for an unique beach-combing opportunity. These small debris fields are usually composed of small bark chips, shells, large tubeworm casings, hermit crabs, algae, kelp, and sometimes even skate egg casings! They usually occur because of local upwellings. An upwelling is an oceanographic phenomenon that involves wind-driven motion of denser, cooler, and usually nutrient-rich water towards the ocean surface, replacing the warmer, usually nutrient-depleted surface water. This juggling of water from the bottom of the ocean to the surface often lifts debris, sitting on the seafloor, into the water column. As the tide comes in the debris is cast onto shore. At the Seaside Aquarium, we fondly refer to these events as ‘Ocean Burps’.
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Turtle Update: Good news, the sea turtle we rescued from Cannon Beach is doing well and is now in a warmer climate! Thunder and Lightning were rescued after they were found beached in Oregon. They were provided initial critical care by the Oregon Coast Aquarium. The sea turtles were transported by the U.S. Coast Guard to San Diego, where they are receiving long-term rehabilitative care at SeaWorld. The turtles were flown on a C-130 Hercules to Naval Base Coronado (Naval Air Station North Island). The SeaWorld Rescue Team picked the sea turtles up there and brought them to the park’s Animal Rescue Center where they are continuing their rehabilitation. The ultimate goal is to return them to their ocean home, giving them a second chance at life.
Seaside Aquarium
Beautiful but deadly! Anemone's tentacles have small microscopic barbs which sting anything that comes in contact with them. Unsuspecting fish who come to close often become the anemone's next meal.
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Meet Mr. and Mrs. Simon, our resident love birds.
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Someone's hungry!
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Join us tomorrow at the Bob Chisholm Community Center (1225 Ave. A, Seaside) for Necanicum Bird Discovery Day! The event is from 10-2. For more information visit, http://www.necanicumwatershed.org/events/bird-day
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Treasure the Beach is this Saturday! Help us keep our beach clean. Monthly cleanups take place on the first Saturday of every month. Volunteers meet on the Prom and are supplied with bags and gloves. Parking is available along Broadway, in the public parking garage on Avenue A, and the public parking lot on 1st Avenue, as well as along city streets.
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#TBT Seaside Aquarium advertising from the 1960's
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If you would like to volunteer with the Haystack Rock Awareness Program here's your chance! A volunteer training session is scheduled for April 9th.
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You can see this anemone's dinner!
Seaside Aquarium
This morning we caught one of our porcelain crabs in the middle of molting! As part of their growth process, crabs actually shed their old shells as they grow new ones. Molted crab shells have all the external parts intact - including legs, antennae, eyes, and gill supports,
Seaside Aquarium
20,000 Gray whales are expected to pass by the Oregon Coast this spring! Time to get your binoculars out of the closet.
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Looking for something fun and educational to do tonight? Join us at the Cannon Beach Library (131 N Hemlock St, Cannon Beach, OR 97110) at 7:00 p.m. Mike Patterson will be this month's speaker for the World of Haystack Rock's library lecture series. Mike will be talking about the different bird species which are currently occupying our coastlines. Hope to see you there!
Seaside Aquarium
Today is International Seal Day!
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Keep a look out for burrowing sea cucumbers! After yesterday's and today's surf, they're bound to show up! These sea cucumbers burrow into sand, mud, or gravel and feed on the organic matter in the sediment. When the surf gets really big, especially during low tide, sand gets lifted up and moved about. This wave-­action dislodges the burrowing sea cucumbers and casts them onto the beach. When stranding on shore they resemble peanut worms and you may see them wiggling as they try to burrow back into the sand. Unlike most other sea cucumbers, they have no tube feet or respiratory tree, oxygen is exchanged through their body wall. Their scientific name is Leptosynapta clarki.
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Just another exciting day on the Oregon Coast!
Seaside Aquarium
It's official Spring is here! Check out our Key Whole Limpet spawning.
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Seaside Aquarium, 200 North Prom, Seaside, Oregon 97138 Tel: (503) 738-6211.