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SEASIDE AQUARIUM

FEED THE SEALS





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Aquarium News

Spring is a busy season with many school groups visiting the Aquarium. In addition to hosting spring visitors, we have:

  • Made a presentation on the history of the Seaside Aquarium for the Seaside Historical Society.
  • Participated in Necanicum Bird and Estuary Day.
  • Provided touch tanks at Cannon Beachís Earth Day Celebration.
  • Assisted in two Haystack Rock Awareness Program training sessions and hosted a third.
  • Helped necropsy two baby whales-a gray whale and a minke whale-for the Marine Mammal Stranding Network.

How to Tidepool

Here are some tips to help make your trip to the tidepools productive and safe.

  • Use a tide book to determine low tide. Anything below a 1.0 tide is good for tidepooling.
  • Arrive at your destination an hour before low tide, so you will have plenty of time to look before the tide changes.
  • Watch the surf and use and common sense. If the tide Child looking at starfish starts coming in, leave (even if the tidebook says you should have more time).
  • Avoid climbing large rocks in or near the surf. Every year, people become stuck when they climb too high and then are stranded as the tide comes in.
  • Respect the habitat you are entering. Tidepools are home for animals large and small; please tread lightly, handle animals gently, and return things as you found them. Take only photos, leave only footprints.
  • Donít go alone. The surf zone is beautiful but can be dangerous as well. It is easy to twist an ankle navigating the rocks.
  • Bring a change of clothes, sunscreen (especially on cloudy days), towels, and your camera.
  • Wear tennis shoes or other shoes that will protect your feet, NOT SANDALS.
A great place for tidepooling is at Haystack Rock in Cannon Beach. Trained volunteers and staff are available during low tides in the summer to answer questions and show some animals that are normally hidden.

Important Beach Safety


1. Never turn your back on the ocean.
Sneaker waves are very powerful, sometimes strong enough to knock over an adult.

2. Avoid logs in the surf.
They may look stable, but the ocean can roll logs large enough to crush you.

3. This is not a safe area for swimming in the ocean.
Be aware there is a strong undercurrent. Children should be kept within armís reach and should go no deeper than their knees.

4. Completely extinguish your campfires.
Embers can burn for days if left or covered.

5. Leave marine mammals alone. Marine mammals can carry diseases transmittable to humans.


New Signs Debunk Oil Myth

Visitors and locals are equally curious and concerned brown ocean surf about the brown foam that appears regularly in the surf on Seaside and neighboring beaches. Recently the Seaside Aquarium has partnered with the City of Seaside to post signs around town to inform the public about the foam. Donít worry, itís not oil. Itís diatoms! Diatoms are singlecelled plants that occur in both fresh and salt water. There are a number of different kinds commonly found in the ocean. When they occur in large diatoms under microscope amounts in the surf zone, they wash ashore. Diatoms are food for animals from plankton to razor clams. They are the sign of a healthy ecosystem! For more information check out the signs located around town.




Photos by: Tiffany Boothe, Brandy Hussa, Jason Hussa, and Keith Chandler

See new photos posted regularly on Facebook!


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Stay connected:

  Twitter @FeedTheSeals Facebook @SeasideAquarium
Seaside Aquarium, 200 North Prom, Seaside, Oregon 97138 Tel: (503) 738-6211.