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SEASIDE AQUARIUM

FEED THE SEALS





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2011 Highlights

In addition to the everyday work of taking care of regular displays, maintenance of the aquarium, and volunteering for the Marine Mammal Stranding network, Aquarium staff also dealt with a regular dose of unusual events. Hereís a sampling:


Frankie Splashing
 
  • Participated in 5th Annual Necanicum Bird Discovery Day in March and Nehalem Crab Derby Day (a fundraiser for the Rinehart Clinic) in July.
  • Welcomed Gretaís pup, Frankie, born June 7.
  • Celebrated Drexler the sealís 28th birthday June 29.
  • Presented the lecture "History of the Seaside Aquarium and its Involvement in the Community" in Cannon Beach for the North Coast Land Conservancyís Listening to the Land series.
  • Ran the Seaside Discovery Programís 16th year on the beach and estuary, with 16 program days through the summer.
  • Responded to a variety of strandings including a humpback whale, a sevengill shark, a salmon shark, and an orca.
  • Collected 576 pounds of food for the local food bank during the December food drive.
  • Volunteered on a Haystack Rock Algae survey.

Important Beach Safety


1. Never turn your back on the ocean.
Sneaker waves are very powerful, sometimes strong enough to knock over an adult.

2. Avoid logs in the surf.
They may look stable, but the ocean can roll logs large enough to crush you.

3. This is not a safe area for swimming in the ocean.
Be aware there is a strong undercurrent. Children should be kept within armís reach and should go no deeper than their knees.

4. Completely extinguish your campfires.
Embers can burn for days if left or covered.

5. Leave marine mammals alone. Marine mammals can carry diseases transmittable to humans.


Creature Feature: Wolf Eels

Wolf eels (Anarrhichthys ocellatus) have been a mainstay of Seaside Aquarium displays for seventy-five years. With their bumpy skin, their large heads, and snaggletoothed sneers, they look like Muppets gone awry. Wolf Eel They are not considered true eels because they have pectoral fins. Active as juveniles, they settle down as adults and spend most of their twenty to thirty year lives hiding in caves, only emerging to crush crabs, snails, and sand dollars with their powerful jaws. Although often viewed as ferocious, they can be very gentle.

This December, one of our wolf eels laid eggs. Wolf eels often pair up around the age of four, usually mating for life. However, they do not reach maturity until closer to age seven. The pair on display are four, so although the female has laid eggs two years in a row, it will likely be a few years before the male will fertilize them.




For up-to-the minute information on Aquarium-related events and many new photos, check us out on Facebook and Twitter!


Photos by: Tiffany Boothe


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Stay connected:

  Twitter @FeedTheSeals Facebook @SeasideAquarium
Seaside Aquarium, 200 North Prom, Seaside, Oregon 97138 Tel: (503) 738-6211.