Seaside Aquarium LOGO

SEASIDE AQUARIUM

FEED THE SEALS





1

2

3

4

PAGES

Aquarium News


  • Seaside Aquarium staff held two talks for the public this fall as part of the public outreach for the Marine Mammal Stranding Network. The first talk was held at the recently completed Seaside Public Library, the second at the Cannon Beach Library. PSU Professor and Director of the program, Dr. Debbie Duffield joined aquarium staff to present information on how the network works, share recent statistics, and tell amusing anecdotes about marine mammal adventures.


  • December marked the Aquariumís annual Food Drive. Admission was free between Thanksgiving and Christmas with a donation of two cans of food. "Hundreds of people participated. We would love to increase that to thousands next year," says General Manager Keith Chandler.


  • The Marine Mammal Stranding Network was very busy in January, dissecting more than 10 sea lions that washed up on the beach. Dissections are done to help determine cause of death. This information is tracked over time to help researchers see any trends in marine mammal life along our coast. Dr. Debbie Duffield and Nelio Barros, a research associate, spent four days on the beach collecting data.


  • Marine Mammal Stranding Network presentation at the
Cannon Beach Library

Important Beach Safety


1. Never turn your back on the ocean.
Sneaker wavers are very powerful, sometimes strong enough to knock over an adult.

2. Avoid logs in the surf.
They may look stable, but the ocean can roll logs over you.

3. This is not a safe area for swimming in the ocean.
Be aware there is a strong undercurrent.

4. Completely extinguish your campfires.
Embers can burn for days if left or covered.

5. Leave marine mammals alone. Marine mammals can carry diseases transmutable to humans and pets.


Juvenile Puget Sound King Crab

Puget Sound King Crab

One of our current favorites at the aquarium is the Puget Sound King Crab. This orange creature is a relative of the box crab. It can grow to be one of the largest crabs along the Pacific Coast, with a carapace (care-uh-pis) or back shell up to six inches across.

The specimens we keep at the aquarium are carefully chosen for their suitability for our set-up. We primarily keep Pacific Northwest animals that can adapt to the temperature changes that occur in the water we pump from the ocean. We are also careful to choose animals that do not need a lot of swimming room. There is usually something new or unusual on display; ask our interpreter to help you find the current featured animal.




Photos by: Tiffany Boothe, Grilch, Dave Pastor, Pam Bierly, Keith Chandler, and PacificLight Images


1

2

3

4

PAGES


Stay connected:

  Twitter @FeedTheSeals Facebook @SeasideAquarium
Seaside Aquarium, 200 North Prom, Seaside, Oregon 97138 Tel: (503) 738-6211.