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SEASIDE AQUARIUM

FEED THE SEALS





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2012 Highlights

In addition to the everyday work of taking care of regular displays, maintenance of the aquarium, and volunteering for the Marine Mammal Stranding network, Aquarium staff also dealt with a regular dose of unusual events. Hereís a sampling:


 
  • Presented a number of lectures on the Seaside Aquarium and the Marine Mammal Stranding Network in venues from Cannon Beach to Astoria.
  • Participated in community events including Necanicum Bird Discovery Day, Nehalem Crab Derby Day, and Cannon Beachís Earth Day Celebration.
  • Ran the Seaside Discovery Programís 17th year on the beach.
  • Worked with the Wildlife Center of the North Coast to hold various birds until they could be retrieved, rehabbed, and released.
  • Collected dead salmon sharks that washed ashore as part of multi-year study by a Stanford researcher.
  • Rescued a beached Soupfin shark which was then transferred to the Oregon Coast Aquarium for rehabilitation.
  • Dealt with some unusual Marine Mammal Stranding Network calls, including a Dallís Porpoise, a Striped Dolphin, a sperm whale, and two gray whales.
  • Won first prize for a business at the Seaside Chamber of Commerceís Winter Lighting Contest (see gray whale King Neptune below).
  • Raised more than 1,200 pounds of food in December in the annual 'Feed the Seals, Feed the Community' food drive for the local food bank.

Christmas decorations in the whale tank.

Important Beach Safety


1. Never turn your back on the ocean.
Sneaker waves are very powerful, sometimes strong enough to knock over an adult.

2. Avoid logs in the surf.
They may look stable, but the ocean can roll logs large enough to crush you.

3. This is not a safe area for swimming in the ocean.
Be aware there is a strong undercurrent. Children should be kept within armís reach and should go no deeper than their knees.

4. Completely extinguish your campfires.
Embers can burn for days if left or covered.

5. Leave marine mammals alone. Marine mammals can carry diseases transmittable to humans.


Crab with double pincher, closeup of the pincher.

Surprising Find

At first glance, it is just a Dungeness Crab. On closer inspection, it has three pincers! This crab was caught off 12th Avenue by Nathan Fulton and then donated to the Aquarium. Crabs have a an exoskeleton. To grow, they develop a new shell underneath the old one, and then shed the old shell in a process called molting. The new shell hardens only after molting. If the crab is injured while soft, it can experience some unusual deformities. The next time this crab molts, it will again have only two pincers.

Crab with double pincher.



For up-to-the minute information on Aquarium-related events and many new photos, check us out on Facebook and Twitter!


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Stay connected:

  Twitter @FeedTheSeals Facebook @SeasideAquarium
Seaside Aquarium, 200 North Prom, Seaside, Oregon 97138 Tel: (503) 738-6211.